Pediatric Physical Therapy

Our pediatric services include coordination, balance and gait training, Orthopedic & Sports, Neurological, Vestibular and Pelvic Floor Rehabilitation. We provide at least one hour, one-on-one treatment sessions for all infants, toddlers and older children. Nina Evangelista, DPT leads our Pediatric Physical Therapy Department.

Pediatric Physical Therapy can be a very effective way to treat:

  • Gross Motor Developmental Delay
  • Hypertonicity or Hypotonicity
  • Poor Balance, Tripping, Clumsy Walking
  • Torticollis
  • Cerebral Palsy
  • Muscular Dystrophy
  • Juvenile Arthritis
  • Vestibular Disorders
  • Other Skeletomuscular Conditions in children

We also offer Pediatric Pelvic Floor therapy. Pelvic floor is a term we use to describe the muscles, ligaments, and connective tissue from the pubic bone to tail bone that support bowel, bladder, intestines, genitals, and rectum. It plays an important role in making these organs function properly. When pelvic floor muscles are weak or tight, in spasm or uncoordinated, the pelvic floor disorder may follow. Pelvic floor disorders in children can also arise from an increased or decreased sensitivity of the nerves surrounding the pelvic floor organs, tissues, and muscles.

If your child is four or more years old and is not toilet trained yet, it is considered to be a medical issue. Consult your pediatrician and inquire about pediatric pelvic floor therapy. The root of this problem may be pelvic floor disorder (see above). In this case, a drug-free physical therapy approach may be the most effective treatment for your child. Come to us and let our highly trained therapists help your child to develop healthy elimination habits and prevent pelvic floor pain and dysfunction later in adulthood.

Here are some examples of the pelvic floor disorders in children that can be effectively treated with physical therapy:

  • Bed wetting during night sleep
  • Incontinence (urinary and/or fecal)
  • Urinary Urgency or Overactive Bladder (constant need to urinate)
  • Urinary Frequency (your child should urinate less than 8 times in a 24-hour period if he or she is older than 4 years)
  • Urinary Retention (not fully emptying bladder)
  • Constipation or Diarrhea with/without soiling/staining
  • Pain with Defecation
  • Excessive Gas and Abdominal Bloating
  • Pelvic Floor Weakness and Pain
  • Pelvic Floor Muscles Incoordination